How much should a 10 year old cat sleep?

How much should a 10 year old cat sleep?

Adult cats tend to have more set sleeping schedules that average out at about 12 – 20 hours of sleep each day. Senior cats will tend to have less energy and reduced mobility which means they will sleep more than younger cats.

Can You Put Your 18 year old cat to sleep?

When I talked to the vet about putting her to sleep, they said she is a healthy animal with manageable concerns and that they would not do that. She is friendly and alert but she is ruining my life. I love her and putting her to sleep would be very upsetting, but being the primary caregiver for a needy, nocturnal animal is upsetting, too.

How often should I weigh my 12 month old cat?

Throughout its life, it is a good idea to weigh your cat every one to two months. If weight is steadily increasing after 12 months of age, you need to start reducing your cat’s food. Weight loss can be an early sign of illness, so check with your vet.

What to expect from a 10 year old cat?

She might not decide to climb the cat condo quite as often or leap from that high bookshelf onto the couch. Mentally, she’s still sharp, but at this age it may take her longer to adjust to changes in her routine or environment. In fact, she may not handle any stress well, and even act fearful of anything new or different.

How many hours does a cat sleep in a day?

An average cat sleeps 12-16 hours in a day. The number goes up to 20 hours for kittens and older cats. It’s different for every cat, of course, but basically, your cat would spend about 2/3 of its life sleeping or napping. Cats sleep a lot, to say the least.

Is it normal for an older cat to sleep all day?

She may tire more quickly when playing and seem less interested in physical activity in general. It’s also perfectly normal for an older cat to sleep more of the day away — up to 20 hours, in fact, just as she may have done when she was a small kitten.

Is it normal for a senior cat to lose weight?

This will help to keep her mind and body healthy. Just like dogs, adult cats are at high risk for obesity, but many older cats start to lose weight as they get further into their senior years. Your veterinarian will be able to give you advice on your cat’s changing dietary needs.

Why does my senior cat spend less time catnapping?

As a veterinarian, the most common medical problem I see in older cats who spend less time catnapping is an overproduction of thyroid hormone by the thyroid gland, known as hyperthyroidism. Among other clinical signs, this causes a cat’s metabolism to increase to the point where she burns off too much body weight despite a ravenous appetite.

She might not decide to climb the cat condo quite as often or leap from that high bookshelf onto the couch. Mentally, she’s still sharp, but at this age it may take her longer to adjust to changes in her routine or environment. In fact, she may not handle any stress well, and even act fearful of anything new or different.