Is saddle thrombus in cats hereditary?

Is saddle thrombus in cats hereditary?

Aortic thromboembolism, also referred to as saddle thrombus, is more common in cats in comparison to dogs, and it is believe to be hereditary in nature.

How is thromboembolism diagnosed in cats?

Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism, although weakness and lameness may be seen. If the rear limbs are affected, there may be decreased or absent pulses in the femoral arteries of the rear legs. Sometimes a front leg is involved.

Can saddle thrombus be prevented?

There is no known mode of prevention for most of the cardiac diseases that predispose cats to saddle thrombus formation.

What happens to a cat with saddle thrombus?

The prognosis for those that don’t have heart disease, other than saddle thrombus, is obviously better but still not good. If a cat does survive saddle thrombus or doesn’t have heart disease, the cat may need to be on blood thinners for the rest of its life and may not have full use of the back legs.

When to seek veterinary care for saddle thrombus?

Due to the time sensitive nature of the irreversible consequences of saddle thrombus, as well as the severe pain that saddle thrombus causes, it is strongly recommended that one seek immediate veterinary care for one’s cat if saddle thrombus is suspected.

What causes thromboembolism of the left heart in cats?

In most affected cats, initial thrombus formation occurs as a consequence of left atrial enlargement caused by significant cardiac disease, most commonly hypertrophic cardiomyopathy; however, any form of cardiomyopathy or congenital defect (e.g., mitral stenosis) affecting the left heart may result in ATE.

Can a mixed breed cat have aortic thromboembolism?

While aortic thromboembolism is a rare occurrence in dogs, this disorder is much more common in cats. Mixed breed cats, Abyssinian, Ragdoll, and Birmans are the most commonly affected, and males are more likely to be diagnosed than females.

The prognosis for those that don’t have heart disease, other than saddle thrombus, is obviously better but still not good. If a cat does survive saddle thrombus or doesn’t have heart disease, the cat may need to be on blood thinners for the rest of its life and may not have full use of the back legs.

What are the symptoms of aortic thromboembolism in cats?

Sudden paralysis and pain, usually in the rear legs, are the most common clinical signs of aortic thromboembolism, although weakness and lameness may be seen. If the rear limbs are affected, there may be decreased or absent pulses in the femoral arteries of the rear legs.

Do you need blood work for saddle thrombus?

Because the symptoms of saddle thrombus are so obvious, a physical examination may be all that’s needed to make a diagnosis. However, if the vet is uncertain or wants to be extremely thorough, he may perform blood work on the cat.

What kind of thrombosis does a feline have?

Feline arterial thromboembolism (ATE) is an acute or peracute, and often devastating, condition that results from embolization of a thrombus within a peripheral artery.