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Why does my wheezing keep coming and going?

Why does my wheezing keep coming and going?

Wheezing happens when the airways are tightened, blocked, or inflamed, making a person’s breathing sound like whistling or squeaking. Common causes include a cold, asthma, allergies, or more serious conditions, such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

Is occasional wheezing normal?

Common causes include infection, an allergic reaction or a physical obstruction, such as a tumor or a foreign object that’s been inhaled. Mild wheezing that occurs along with symptoms of a cold or upper respiratory infection (URI), does not always need treatment.

What is recurrent wheeze?

Inflammation and narrowing of the airway in any location, from your throat out into your lungs, can result in wheezing. The most common causes of recurrent wheezing are asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which both cause narrowing and spasms (bronchospasms) in the small airways of your lungs.

What does it mean when you wheeze all the time?

Occasionally, wheezing can indicate a serious medical condition such as a growth or tumor in your throat or lungs. Problems with your vocal chords — including growths and abnormal motion — can also lead to wheezing. If your wheezing is an ongoing problem, ask your doctor to test you for conditions that can cause wheezing.

What causes wheezing in the winter in the UK?

It is usually caused by a virus called the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Bronchiolitis in the UK usually occurs in the winter months (November to March). An infection anywhere in the respiratory tract may trigger wheezing.

When to call the emergency services for wheezing?

Wheezing may also be an indication of: Wheezing may be triggered by short-term illnesses or health emergencies, including: Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency. You should call 911 or your local emergency services if you begin to experience anaphylaxis symptoms such as dizziness, a swollen tongue or throat, or trouble breathing.

Wheezing could be a sign of asthma, a lung disease, a severe allergic reaction, or exposure to chemicals. It could also signal pneumonia or bronchitis. Treatment depends on the cause. You might need oxygen to help you breathe. If asthma ’s to blame, an inhaler could be part of your treatment plan to stop flare-ups.

Is it possible for someone to die from wheezing?

There are many causes of wheezing. Even if a person has asthma, wheezing could potentially be a symptom of another, and possibly life-threatening condition. In addition, people still die from asthma, and far too often.

It is usually caused by a virus called the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Bronchiolitis in the UK usually occurs in the winter months (November to March). An infection anywhere in the respiratory tract may trigger wheezing.

Wheezing may also be an indication of: Wheezing may be triggered by short-term illnesses or health emergencies, including: Anaphylaxis is a medical emergency. You should call 911 or your local emergency services if you begin to experience anaphylaxis symptoms such as dizziness, a swollen tongue or throat, or trouble breathing.