Can you travel with a diabetic cat?

Can you travel with a diabetic cat?

Typically, most diabetic pets can travel safely. However, just like humans, each pet is different. I would advise you to first check with your vet regarding his opinion on your cat traveling safely with his diabetes.

How much does it cost to board a diabetic cat?

Diabetic cats must board individually, in a double-sized (two-room) condo, at a nightly boarding cost of $45-$65/night, depending on the level of care.

How often do cats go into remission from diabetes?

Not all cats go into remission, but those that do may stay that way for months or years. One estimate states that 17 to 67% of cats experience remission after insulin therapy.

What do you need to know about diabetes in cats?

In addition to extensive home care, diabetic cats need frequent visits to the veterinary hospital for blood monitoring, urine tests, and physical exams. Considering the effort it takes to care for a cat with diabetes, remission, even short term, is a welcome relief for both cat and cat owner. What is diabetic remission?

What happens to a diabetic cat if untreated?

The cat urinates more which makes him thirsty and he drinks more water. The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along with weight loss. If untreated, diabetes results in vomiting, dehydration, lethargy, coma, vision loss, and even death. How are cats with diabetes treated?

How long can you give a diabetic cat insulin?

A 10 ml vial is good for at least 3–4 months, maybe longer if handled properly. Most cats require very little insulin, so some of the insulin will go to waste, even if it lasts for 6 months. Pharmacists may tell you that you can use the bottle only for 1 month. They are wrong.

When to take a diabetic cat to the vet?

Having a diabetic cat is also a big commitment, as it requires dedicated pet parents who can give twice-a-day injections of insulin (especially when you go on vacation). When in doubt, if you notice any of these signs in your cat, get to a veterinarian right away for some blood work and a urine sample.

Can a diabetic cat live a long life?

With appropriate care and treatment, cats with DM can live a long, healthy life, although they will require frequent trips to the veterinarian to regulate the blood sugar. Having a diabetic cat is also a big commitment, as it requires dedicated pet parents who can give twice-a-day injections of insulin (especially when you go on vacation).

Not all cats go into remission, but those that do may stay that way for months or years. One estimate states that 17 to 67% of cats experience remission after insulin therapy.

The cat urinates more which makes him thirsty and he drinks more water. The common signs of diabetes include increases in appetite, water consumption, and urination, along with weight loss. If untreated, diabetes results in vomiting, dehydration, lethargy, coma, vision loss, and even death. How are cats with diabetes treated?