Are Maine Coons prone to kidney disease?

Are Maine Coons prone to kidney disease?

Cystic renal disease occurs with a low prevalence in Maine Coons and is unrelated to the PKD observed in Persians and related breeds. Ultrasonographical findings compatible with CKD are not uncommon in juvenile Maine Coons.

Why is my Maine Coon cat losing weight?

Common GI problems that produce weight loss in cats include inflammatory bowel disease, food allergies, or certain infections. Intestinal parasites. Also known as worms, intestinal parasites may be the cause of your cat’s unintentional weight loss.

Are Maine Coon cats smarter?

Maine coons are also highly intelligent pets, and they can be trained to perform simple tricks on command. They like to play fetch, making them ideal for the more active pet owner.

Are Maine Coons good with cats?

They love to play and are very affectionate, so if you’re looking for a cat to show you some love when you get home, this is the perfect breed for you. Maine Coons love to socialise with other people and pets, so they make great additions to a large family, whether human or feline!

What kind of kidney disease does a Maine Coon have?

Polycystic Kidney Disease, or PKD, is a genetic disease in Maine Coon cats where small cysts in the kidneys develop. The cysts are present at birth, and they multiply and grow in size as the cat ages. As the cysts develop, they tend to replace normal kidney tissue. The kidneys increase in size, and this leads to a decline in renal function.

Is there a cure for PKD in Maine Coon?

Unfortunately no, PKD is considered a non treatable progressive disease, which means over time the cat will get worse as the cysts get larger. The best you can do, is provide a diet that is kidney friendly (low in sodium and phosphorus) and keep your Maine Coon hydrated so the kidneys are constantly flushed.

What to do if your Maine Coon has health problems?

As you might expect, a professional Maine Coon breeder, whether private or a fully TICA registered cattery will most likely perform screens for these disorders. Not only that, but selective breeding takes place, that is bloodlines that carry the gene are deselected for breeding. This ensures maximum chances of receiving a healthy cat.

Who was the captain of the Maine Coon?

Another folk tale involves Captain Charles Coon, an English seafarer who kept long-haired cats aboard his ships. Whenever Coon’s ship would anchor in New England ports, the felines would exit the ship and mate with the local feral cat population.

Polycystic Kidney Disease, or PKD, is a genetic disease in Maine Coon cats where small cysts in the kidneys develop. The cysts are present at birth, and they multiply and grow in size as the cat ages. As the cysts develop, they tend to replace normal kidney tissue. The kidneys increase in size, and this leads to a decline in renal function.

Unfortunately no, PKD is considered a non treatable progressive disease, which means over time the cat will get worse as the cysts get larger. The best you can do, is provide a diet that is kidney friendly (low in sodium and phosphorus) and keep your Maine Coon hydrated so the kidneys are constantly flushed.

As you might expect, a professional Maine Coon breeder, whether private or a fully TICA registered cattery will most likely perform screens for these disorders. Not only that, but selective breeding takes place, that is bloodlines that carry the gene are deselected for breeding. This ensures maximum chances of receiving a healthy cat.

When does a Maine Coon Kitten become too weak?

Around 3 to 4 months into its life it will develop a ‘wobble’ in its abilities. If the degeneration continues, 5 or 6 months from birth the kitten could well be too weak to jump and play. For a domestic cat, it is relatively painless and confines a Maine Coon to a more suitable life indoors.