Is minoxidil toxic?

Is minoxidil toxic?

Minoxidil is a directly acting vasodilator, which was used as an antihypertensive agent in rare cases of refractory hypertension. In the present times, it is more commonly used as a topical application in alopecia. There are only a few reported cases in literature of poisoning due to ingestion of topical minoxidil.

Can minoxidil cause death?

There is little likelihood of significant adverse effects attributable to topical minoxidil because of its low systemic absorption. The evidence suggests that these deaths were the result of causes other than use of the drug.

Why is minoxidil bad?

As a vasodilator, minoxidil causes an increase in blood supply, which can also increase your heart rate. Healthcare providers may advise people with pre-existing heart conditions against using products containing minoxidil because it can increase heart rate and cause chest pains, signaling heart failure.

What happens if I stop minoxidil?

What happens if you stop minoxidil? If you stop applying minoxidil to your scalp, you’ll gradually lose any hair that you’ve regrown as a result of the medication. Minoxidil is a well-studied medication that’s safe to use for the long term.

Is minoxidil bad for your skin?

Depending on the formulation, the most common side effect of minoxidil is skin irritation at or near the application site. In some cases, minoxidil users can develop a skin rash or experience a mild burning feeling after using minoxidil spray or foam.

Why you should not use minoxidil?

Is minoxidil safe for long term use?

In most cases, Minoxidil is safe for long term use. Here’s what you need to know: Side effects with Minoxidil are limited and will subside when you stop taking the medication. Some patients may experience mild scalp irritation.

What happens if you give a cat minoxidil?

Minoxidil® Toxicity in Cats. Minoxidil® exposure can result in lethargy, hypotension, pulmonary edema, damage to the heart muscle and death from cardiac failure. Initial signs of lethargy generally begin within 12 hours and heart damage occurs 3-4 days following exposure.

Which is more dangerous for cats, minoxidil or PPG?

Minoxidil is mainly water, PPG and alcohol. Minoxidil is only small part of it. IMO your cat is in just as much more danger from clothes detergent than minoxidil. Floor cleaner and houseplant dirt is probably more of an issue. Stuff like that… My GF has two cats…I don’t worry about it. Minoxidil is mainly water, PPG and alcohol.

What happens to the heart after minoxidil exposure?

Minoxidil® exposure can result in lethargy, hypotension, pulmonary edema, damage to the heart muscle and death from cardiac failure. Initial signs of lethargy generally begin within 12 hours and heart damage occurs 3-4 days following exposure.

Is it safe to take minoxidil for hair growth?

Minoxidil® is a topical solution used to promote hair growth in people. These medications have become very common and popular over the past 5 years. According to the fall ASPCA newsletter, six cases involving Minoxidil® exposure were reported since 2001.

Minoxidil® Toxicity in Cats. Minoxidil® exposure can result in lethargy, hypotension, pulmonary edema, damage to the heart muscle and death from cardiac failure. Initial signs of lethargy generally begin within 12 hours and heart damage occurs 3-4 days following exposure.

Is it safe to give minoxidil to hairless dogs?

A 1997 study involved the application of 3 % minoxidil to hairless puppies (descendants of Mexican hairless dogs) for 31 days. Side effects were not observed. However, minoxidil should never be applied to any animal. Suspected toxicosis after topical administration of minoxidil in 2 cats.

Minoxidil is mainly water, PPG and alcohol. Minoxidil is only small part of it. IMO your cat is in just as much more danger from clothes detergent than minoxidil. Floor cleaner and houseplant dirt is probably more of an issue. Stuff like that… My GF has two cats…I don’t worry about it. Minoxidil is mainly water, PPG and alcohol.

Minoxidil® exposure can result in lethargy, hypotension, pulmonary edema, damage to the heart muscle and death from cardiac failure. Initial signs of lethargy generally begin within 12 hours and heart damage occurs 3-4 days following exposure.