Why do my cats eyes look darker?

Why do my cats eyes look darker?

Iris melanosis is darkening of the iris of cats that occurs from proliferation of cells that produce a brown pigment called mela- nin. The condition may occur in cats with any color of eye and at any age. In many cats, the progression of the melanosis is very slow (several years).

What does it mean when a cat eye changes color?

Changing color is commonly an indicator of an eye infection, but could also be a sign of a more serious condition. One common eye condition in cats is an eyeball inflammation known as uveitis, which can do permanent damage if left untreated. Symptoms include abnormally yellow, red or orange colored eyes.

Why does my eye color look darker?

As previously mentioned, exposure to light causes your body to produce more melanin. Even if your eye color has set, your eye color could slightly change if you expose your eyes to more sunlight. As a result, your eyes might appear a darker shade of brown, blue, green, or gray, depending on your current eye color.

Why do some cats have darker eyes than others?

The general rule of thumb for cat eye color genetics is that the fewer melanocytes a cat has available, the lighter the shade of eye color, and the more there are, the darker and deeper they will be. From colors denoting the least pigment cells to most, and allowing for variations and shades, the basic range of colors goes something like this:

When do kittens eyes start to change color?

Normal cat eye color. Normal cat eyes cover a range of different colors. The majority of kittens are born with blue eyes. Between the age of three to eight weeks, kittens’ eyes begin to change to colors ranging from green, yellow and orange to amber, copper and brown.

What does it mean when your cat’s eyes turn brown?

Cat Eye Color as an Indicator of Serious Disease. If your cat’s eyes suddenly seem dark yellow or unusually brown, your cat may be suffering from a more serious underlying health condition. Changes in color of this type often indicate a buildup of red blood cells in the eyeball.

What does it mean when your cat’s eyes change?

Changes in a cat’s eye color can be an indicator of a potentially serious health problem. Normal cat eyes cover a range of different colors. The majority of kittens are born with blue eyes. Between the age of three to eight weeks, kittens’ eyes begin to change to colors ranging from green, yellow and orange to amber, copper and brown.

The general rule of thumb for cat eye color genetics is that the fewer melanocytes a cat has available, the lighter the shade of eye color, and the more there are, the darker and deeper they will be. From colors denoting the least pigment cells to most, and allowing for variations and shades, the basic range of colors goes something like this:

Normal cat eye color. Normal cat eyes cover a range of different colors. The majority of kittens are born with blue eyes. Between the age of three to eight weeks, kittens’ eyes begin to change to colors ranging from green, yellow and orange to amber, copper and brown.

Changes in a cat’s eye color can be an indicator of a potentially serious health problem. Normal cat eyes cover a range of different colors. The majority of kittens are born with blue eyes. Between the age of three to eight weeks, kittens’ eyes begin to change to colors ranging from green, yellow and orange to amber, copper and brown.

Cat Eye Color as an Indicator of Serious Disease. If your cat’s eyes suddenly seem dark yellow or unusually brown, your cat may be suffering from a more serious underlying health condition. Changes in color of this type often indicate a buildup of red blood cells in the eyeball.