Can a vaccinated cat get an upper respiratory infection?

Can a vaccinated cat get an upper respiratory infection?

Vaccinated cats, if exposed, become infected and are likely to become chronic virus carriers. Susceptible, nonvaccinated cats, on the other hand, will become infected and develop the full spectrum of clinical signs of acute-onset upper respiratory infection.

Which two viruses cause respiratory disease in cats?

Cat flu, or upper respiratory infection (URI) is a very common disease that can vary considerably in severity, and on occasions can even be life-threatening. In the vast majority of cases, disease results from infection with feline calicivirus (FCV) or feline herpes virus (FHV, or FHV-1).

Can vaccinated cats get FHV?

The risk of infection increases in cats that are unvaccinated, are young, or have chronic underlying problems. Adult cats that have been adequately vaccinated will likely only develop a mild case of illness, which may resolve without treatment. “A cat that has an acute FVR infection will be infective to other cats.”

How is feline respiratory disease transmitted?

These viruses can be transmitted from cat to cat through sneezing, coughing, or while grooming or sharing food and water bowls. Once infected, cats can become carriers for life, and though they may not show clinical signs, they can still transmit the viruses to others.

What are the most common respiratory infections in cats?

The most common causes are two viruses—the feline herpesvirus and the feline calicivirus. Together, these make up almost 90 percent of the infections we see. There are a few other agents, including feline chlamydiosis, mycoplasma and Bordetella —and some cats may be infected with more than one respiratory infection virus.

What happens if you give your cat a flu shot?

Feline herpes virus and feline calicivirus Vaccines for feline herpes virus (FHV-1) and feline calicivirus (FCV) are always combined, as these two viruses together are the main causes of upper respiratory tract infections in cats (cat flu). Affected cats typically show sneezing, nasal discharge, conjunctivitis, eye discharge, and mouth ulcers.

What kind of virus does a cat have?

Most cat URIs are caused by infection with one or both of the cat flu viruses: Feline herpes virus (FHV or FHV-1, formerly known as feline rhinotracheitis virus) These two viruses are thought to be responsible for more than 90% of URIs in cats. Other important organisms that may be involved in some cases include:

How does calicivirus affect a feline’s lungs?

Feline calicivirus most often affects the lining of the mouth and the lungs. There are many related strains of feline caliciviruses. Some caliciviruses cause few or no signs. Some strains cause sores in the mouth, while others produce fluid buildup in the lungs (pulmonary edema) and pneumonia.

The most common causes are two viruses—the feline herpesvirus and the feline calicivirus. Together, these make up almost 90 percent of the infections we see. There are a few other agents, including feline chlamydiosis, mycoplasma and Bordetella —and some cats may be infected with more than one respiratory infection virus.

What kind of disease does feline calicivirus cause?

Feline Calicivirus. Feline calicivirus is a highly contagious virus that causes a mild to severe respiratory infection and oral disease in cats. It is especially common in shelters and breeding colonies, and often infects young cats. Most cats recover completely after a calicivirus infection, but rare strains can be especially deadly.

How long do cats sneeze after a calicivirus shot?

The vaccines given nasally contain a modified live form of the virus, while injected vaccines can be modified live viruses or inactivated ones. Cats that receive the nasal vaccine may sneeze for four to seven days after vaccination.

Most cat URIs are caused by infection with one or both of the cat flu viruses: Feline herpes virus (FHV or FHV-1, formerly known as feline rhinotracheitis virus) These two viruses are thought to be responsible for more than 90% of URIs in cats. Other important organisms that may be involved in some cases include: